STRFTIME(3)             NetBSD Library Functions Manual            STRFTIME(3)


NAME
strftime, strftime_z -- format date and time
LIBRARY
Standard C Library (libc, -lc)
SYNOPSIS
#include <time.h> size_t strftime(char * restrict buf, size_t maxsize, const char * restrict format, const struct tm * restrict timeptr); size_t strftime_z(const timezone_t tz, char * restrict buf, size_t maxsize, const char * restrict format, const struct tm * restrict timeptr);
DESCRIPTION
The strftime() function formats the information from timeptr into the buffer buf according to the string pointed to by format. The format string consists of zero or more conversion specifications and ordinary characters. All ordinary characters are copied directly into the buffer. A conversion specification consists of a percent sign `%' and one other character. No more than maxsize characters will be placed into the buffer. If the total number of resulting characters, including the terminating null character, is not more than maxsize, strftime() returns the number of characters in the buffer, not counting the terminating null. Otherwise, zero is returned and the contents of the buffer are undefined. Each conversion specification is replaced by the characters as follows which are then copied into the buffer. %A is replaced by the locale's full weekday name. %a is replaced by the locale's abbreviated weekday name. %B is replaced by the locale's full month name. %b or %h is replaced by the locale's abbreviated month name. %C is replaced by the century (a year divided by 100 and truncated to an integer) as a decimal number [00,99]. %c is replaced by the locale's appropriate date and time representa- tion. %D is replaced by the date in the format ``%m/%d/%y''. %d is replaced by the day of the month as a decimal number [01,31]. %e is replaced by the day of month as a decimal number [1,31]; single digits are preceded by a blank. %F is replaced by the date in the format ``%Y-%m-%d'' (the ISO 8601 date format). %G is replaced by the ISO 8601 year with century as a decimal number. %g is replaced by the ISO 8601 year without century as a decimal num- ber (00-99). This is the year that includes the greater part of the week. (Monday as the first day of a week). See also the `%V' conversion specification. %H is replaced by the hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number [00,23]. %I is replaced by the hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number [01,12]. %j is replaced by the day of the year as a decimal number [001,366]. %k is replaced by the hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number [0,23]; single digits are preceded by a blank. %l is replaced by the hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number [1,12]; single digits are preceded by a blank. %M is replaced by the minute as a decimal number [00,59]. %m is replaced by the month as a decimal number [01,12]. %n is replaced by a newline. %p is replaced by the locale's equivalent of either ``AM'' or ``PM''. %R is replaced by the time in the format ``%H:%M''. %r is replaced by the locale's representation of 12-hour clock time using AM/PM notation. %S is replaced by the second as a decimal number [00,60]. The range of seconds is (00-60) instead of (00-59) to allow for the periodic occurrence of leap seconds. %s is replaced by the number of seconds since the Epoch (see ctime(3)). %T is replaced by the time in the format ``%H:%M:%S''. %t is replaced by a tab. %U is replaced by the week number of the year (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number [00,53]. %u is replaced by the weekday (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number [1,7]. %V is replaced by the week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number [01,53]. According to ISO 8601 the week containing January 1 is week 1 if it has four or more days in the new year, otherwise it is week 53 of the previous year, and the next week is week 1. The year is given by the `%G' conversion specification. %v is replaced by the date in the format ``%e-%b-%Y''. %W is replaced by the week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number [00,53]. %w is replaced by the weekday (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number [0,6]. %X is replaced by the locale's appropriate time representation. %x is replaced by the locale's appropriate date representation. %Y is replaced by the year with century as a decimal number. %y is replaced by the year without century as a decimal number [00,99]. %Z is replaced by the time zone name. %z is replaced by the offset from the Prime Meridian in the format +HHMM or -HHMM (ISO 8601) as appropriate, with positive values rep- resenting locations east of Greenwich, or by the empty string if this is not determinable. The numeric time zone [-]0000 is used when the time is Universal Time but local time is indeterminate; by convention this is used for locations while uninhabited, and corre- sponds to a zero offset when the time zone abbreviation begins with ``[-]''. %% is replaced by `%'. The strftime_z() function is similar to strftime(), but it also takes a const timezone_t tz argument.
SEE ALSO
date(1), printf(1), ctime(3), printf(3), strptime(3), tm(3)
STANDARDS
The strftime() function conforms to ISO/IEC 9899:1999 (``ISO C99''). The `%C', `%D', `%e', `%g', `%G', `%h', `%k', `%l', `%n', `%r', `%R', `%s', `%t', `%T', `%u', `%V', and `%v' conversion specifications are exten- sions. Use of the ISO 8601 conversions may produce non-intuitive results. Week 01 of a year is per definition the first week which has the Thursday in this year, which is equivalent to the week which contains the fourth day of January. In other words, the first week of a new year is the week which has the majority of its days in the new year. Week 01 might also contain days from the previous year and the week before week 01 of a year is the last week (52 or 53) of the previous year even if it contains days from the new year. A week starts with Monday (day 1) and ends with Sun- day (day 7). For example, the first week of the year 1997 lasts from 1996-12-30 to 1997-01-05.
BUGS
There is no conversion specification for the phase of the moon. A return value of zero does not necessarily indicate an error. If the resulting string is an empty string, the result value is zero and it is not possible to distinguish between success and error. For example, in many locales %p yields an empty string. This problem can be avoided by inserting an extra space at the beginning of the format string and then skipping over it or removing it from the result. NetBSD 8.0 March 11, 2017 NetBSD 8.0

You can also request any man page by name and (optionally) by section:

Command: 
Section: 
Architecture: 
Collection: 
 

Use the DEFAULT collection to view manual pages for third-party software.


Powered by man-cgi 1.15, Panagiotis Christias
Modified for NetBSD by Kimmo Suominen